The Reckoning landed on my door matt after a mix up; however, as with virtually every crime novel, I was intrigued by this tome. It’s not every day that a book arrives, after all! Please note, this review contains spoilers.

The book as a whole:

Instantly, I was captivated by the language and the method of storytelling; I have a tendency to read about plots in either the UK or America. However, this takes place in Iceland, a departure from what I tend to read. (It’s a cross between The Snowman and The Child.

At first, I was staying up late to read this book; it reminded me of The Shadow Of The Wind, due to the break-neck pace, genre blends, etc.

But: I was disappointed with this book. And by the end, I felt inexplicably angry, as it was almost as if the characters had suddenly become real. Too real in fact.

Characterisation and plot:

The plot seems too eerily now, in mirroring what has been in the news recently; a time capsule is dug up, and in it is a note that says x amount of people are going to die. At the same time, a school in America (twinning with this project) also dig up their time capsule. Yet, as a detective and his sidekick, a child physiologist, try to “crack the case”, the bodies rack up.

As to the ending? Well, I could not help but feel more than a bit disturbed. The killings were in revenge for the killing of a little girl, Vaka, in collaboration with the son of the alleged killer. But… this brings me on to characters.

Who dreams up a scene where a man dressed as Santa tries to abduct two young children? There was also one character that had me raging; when kidnapped, he has to have his hands cut off, to save his children from being abused. Yet, when asked to name one of his children, he does! And he pities himself, not the child afterwards!

What to improve:

There could have been a lot less description, and more cutting to the chase. I also did not like the fact that the reader can see when someone is going to be kidnapped, and yet it leaves the Detective clueless. “Wake up, he’s about to be killed!” is what I wanted to shout-yet couldn’t, as it is fiction.

In conclusion:

On finishing this book, I felt such a sense of betrayal; there is also a twist at the end which I did not see coming. However, I think that it would be suited to someone more at GCSE level; I would have also liked a book without the scenes I mentioned under Characterisation And Plot.

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Disclaimer: this book was sent to me via a member of the publicity team at Hodder & Stroughton. However, this post contains my honest opinion, and is not advertising; I have also not received any fee for review. You can read more about this in my disclaimer.