Women Empowerment Tag

Last week, my day was made by my pen pal Lisa; over on her blog, she had included me as part of her Women Empowerment Tag. Since I’ve blogged only sporadically recently, it seemed that today was the right time to answer her tag. Thank you Lisa for tagging me.

What are the rules?

First of all, answer these five questions:

  • What does women empowerment mean to you?
  • What woman/women do you most admire?  Why?
  • Share a story, drawing, or video that you think says “empowered women.”
  • Share the best lesson you’ve learned in leadership.
  • What cause do you most want to bring awareness to?  Why?  What does it mean to you?

Then, tag five more women to do the same, and link your post to Women Wednesday Women Empowerment Tag. Then, either tag them on Twitter or Instagram. 

Questions:

What does women empowerment mean to you?

That we support each other-women having the ‘back of other women, come Hell or High-water. I have met some super awesome female journalists, and they have always stood by me. They are the ones who say “Lydia, keep going”, “You’ve got this”, “Girl, keep trying.” They do not patronise me, they see me for me; they stand up for me if there’s sexism, and they are the people who encourage me. They embody this concept to me; to empower women means supporting ALL women. 

What woman/women do you most admire?  Why?

There are a lot. I’ll keep it brief, though.

First of all, in relation to my work for Byline, one woman who I admire is Louise Medus-Mansell, who died recently. (BBC report here.) She was a campaigner, and her story lead me directly to writing about Thalidomide; every person who I consider to be a source was so upset, and they spoke of nothing but her kindness. I wish I had met her, really I do.

For a while now, Jacqueline Kennedy has been one of my heroes, enough so that her picture sits on my bedside table. She was very literary, and yet she’s known largely because of her clothes, which she disliked.

Sylvia Plath would have to be on the list, for the sheer magnetism of her poetry; I use to scare people by being able to recite ‘Daddy’ from my memory.

I could go on, but this post is already very long..

Share a story, drawing, or video that you think says “empowered women.”

This is taken from Youtube:

“Who wants a love without anger and rage? I do!”

Share the best lesson you’ve learned in leadership.

This is the question I had the most trouble with; I wouldn’t consider myself to be a leader. I was the sort who was always picked last for PE, after all. I guess what I’ve learnt is to forget the ‘naysayers’-those who say “oh, you can’t do that” for a reason that seems almost petty. (One example I can think of is: “You can’t be a journalist; you’re autistic!”

What cause do you most want to bring awareness to?  Why?  What does it mean to you?

Thalidomide is important to me; I also believe that attention should be turned to journalists, and how they are being targeted in large numbers. I had a recent conversation with a friend about Daphne Caruana Galizia; “I read her last blog entry the day after she died, Lyds” they said. “That broke my heart.”

This struck me, really. Women have ‘lead journalism’ this year-just look at Windrush, Cambridge Anayltica. But they still get so much rubbish online. Newsrooms aren’t necessarily a friendly environment, either.

But these women cannot be confined to history. We need to remember them. And we need to ensure that this cannot happen to any journalist.

I tag Chelsea Kerley, Envy Fisher, Rebekah Gillian, and Abbie Jones. (I couldn’t come up with a fifth!)

1 Comment

  1. November 29, 2018 / 1:48 pm

    Wow, thank you Lydia for such an empowering post. You have just given me a list of women to research. They all sound so amazing and so strong! And I love your focus on women journalists. Y’all are kicking some serious ass! You’ve got my support, come hell or high-water! Thanks for writing up this tag!!❤️

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.